Announcing All Soldiers Run Away: Alano’s War, The Story of a British Deserter

Lammi Publishing, Inc. is pleased to announce that it has acquired the rights to the biography All Soldiers Run Away: Alano’s War, The Story of a British Deserter by Andy Owen.

All Soldiers Run Away: Alano’s War, The Story of a British Deserter is the story of Alan Juniper’s wartime experiences in the North African and Italian Campaigns in the Second World War, as well as a wider look at the taboo subject of desertion both then and today. Alan served with the Eighth Army in North Africa, arriving in Egypt in 1941. His battalion, the Tower Hamlets Rifles found itself in the first battle in which German General Erwin Rommel and his Afrika Korps engaged with Allied forces in Africa. Alan and his battalion fought and took heavy losses in a series of intense and confusing battles. They fought against an enemy they began to believe was superior, as they lost confidence in their own leadership, and moved mostly back, but occasionally forth, across the unforgiving sands. After having served for over 500 days, when the Eighth Army was at its nadir having been forced back to Alamein, at the same time that a no confidence motion being tabled against the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and plans were being made to evacuate Cairo, Alan deserted. Soon captured, he was thrown in to military prison, surviving the tough regime until given the chance to be released to fight in the Italian Campaign as the war began to turn in the Allies favour. He again became involved in some intense, but little known, battles this time in the hills of central Italy. After witnessing the carnage of the night fighting in the hills surrounding Perugia, he deserted a second time. A broken man in a broken landscape he arrived in a small Umbrian village and was taken in by a people that had only months before been the enemy. He became part of the community in this village, helping the community survive the vicissitudes of post-occupation life, forming relationships that would last the rest of his life, until he was eventually arrested again at the end of the war.

Sixty years later the reasons for Alan’s desertion started to surface. After a series of sessions with a psychologist from the charity Combat Stress Alan was finally diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. One incident in particular seemed to be a key cause of his PTSD – an incident occurring at some point in his time in the desert when, during one of the many heavy bombardments he was exposed to, he became trapped in a bunker with a live unexploded shell blocking the bunker entrance as the ground continued to shake from the continued shelling. It was only when the onset of Alzheimer’s made his condition more acute, after a lifetime of having been affected by the condition undiagnosed, that his family became aware of some of Alan’s experiences and his original desertion. As the Alzheimer’s progressed he became convinced that any new people who came to see him were Royal Military Police officers come to take him away again. As the family discovered new revelations concerning his wartime experiences and treatment, they decided it was time to tell his story. All Soldiers Run Away is the search for Alan’s story in lost battles, missing war diaries and faded memories. Through his story and contrasting desertions from the same war and more recent conflicts the book looks at some of the reasons soldiers desert. It examines why the military and society attaches shame to those who desert, and goes on to explore what duties soldiers have towards each other and the communities from which they come from.

Andy Owen served in the Intelligence Corps of the British Army reaching the rank of Captain. He completed operational tours in Northern Ireland (2003), Iraq (2004 and 2005) and in Helmand Province, Afghanistan in 2007. All Soldiers Run Away is his third book following the novels; East of Coker (2016) and Invective (2014).

Publication date to be announced.

Paperbacks

Lammi Publishing is pleased to announce that our future titles will be available in paperback form as well as ebook. Some of our catalog titles will also be converted into paperback.

When we were first discussing the idea for the company in the beginning of 2014, one of the things we considered was the best way to produce the books. What format would be both cost-effective and accessible? At that time, considering the Canadian market, what made the most sense was to publish in purely digital format. Offset printing was and still is horribly expensive, and at that time print on-demand was not available in the sort of quality we at Lammi Publishing would have been proud to put our name behind.

At this time, we have published three books and have several more in the pipeline. A week doesn’t go by in which we do not receive queries about print copies. The cost of production as well as the quality has improved.

This is an exciting step to be able to put our authors’ wonderful research in front of more readers and allow for more ways for our readers to enjoy our books.

We would also like to take this opportunity to thank our authors for being willing to join in the latest chapter of Lammi Publishing.

Table of Contents for Canadians and War Volume 2: Vimy Ridge

 Now available Canadians and War Volume 2: Vimy Ridge


Lammi Publishing, Inc. is pleased to release the table of contents for our book of essays on the Battle of  Vimy Ridge  to be released shortly.

 

“A Dominion Comes of Age: The Battle of Vimy Ridge” by Karen Hann

Karen Hann
Karen Hann is a freelance writer and editor living in Lethbridge, Alberta. She received her Bachelor of Arts (English) degree at the University of Lethbridge and her Master of Arts (English; Creative Writing) degree at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton.

 

“How did the Canadian Corps Achieve the Magnificent Victory at Vimy Ridge when Other Allied Armies Failed?” by W.A. Leavey

Lieutenant Colonel W.A. (Bill) Leavey, MA, CD (Retired)
Lieutenant-Colonel (Retired) W.A. (Bill) Leavey served in the Canadian Army Infantry from 1967 to 2008. The field units he served in include the Black Watch, Royal Highland Regiment of Canada (RHC), the Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR), the Canadian Airborne Regiment (CAR), and the Princess of Wales Own Regiment (PWOR). From 1994 to 1998 he was seconded with Veterans Affairs Canada as military liaison officer for the Canada Remembers Program, a commemoration group celebrating battle and campaign anniversaries for all of Canada’s major wartime events. LCol Leavey holds a Master’s degree in English from the Royal Military College. He has written two books of anecdotes for the RHC and RCR, entitled War Stories, Anecdotes and Lies. LCol Leavey has also published numerous stories, articles, and essays on military humour and humour in general in local and national magazines and newspapers. He lives in Kingston, Ontario with his wife Maureen, a 35-year veteran herself, and their Labradoodle Finnegan

 

“Vimy Ridge: Sons and Brothers” by Keith Elliott

Keith Elliott
Keith Elliott is a stonecutter and artist living in Wallace, Nova Scotia. His blog can be found at www.ramblingriverside.com

 

 

 

Passive Voice

Sometime in the near future, we will be releasing a booklet that explains our conventions and house style in great detail. This will be helpful for our authors to understand exactly how to best put their work together for publication. Up until the release, we will, from time to time, be posting small previews on the blog.


Passive Voice

Lammi Publishing prefers that authors, in most circumstances, use active, rather than passive voice. That is, you say, “The platoon captured the village,” not “the village was captured by the platoon.” There are exceptions to this, such as when you seek to emphasize the receiver, rather than the doer of the action, like “the corporal has been shot,” if the doer of the action doesn’t matter within context. These situations, however, tend to be few and far between. Some scholars do believe that passive voice lends itself to impartiality, but that is generally specific to the sciences, where the researchers want to remove themselves from the equation by saying things like “the solution was set at 33 ppm.” In humanities writing, active voice works much more effectively to engage an audience. We certainly expect academic professionalism from our authors, but at the end of the day, we are telling stories, and we are selling those stories to audience members who are far more likely to keep reading if they can absorb themselves into the tale.

Table of Contents for Canadians and War, Vol. 1

The book is now available directly through the publisher or through all major ebook retailers.


Lammi Publishing, Inc. is pleased to release the table of contents for our first semi-annual essay collection on Canadian military history.

Lunenburg’s “Quiet Riot” and Maritime Resistance to the 1917 Military Service Act
by Maryanne Lewell

Maryanne Lewell is a PhD candidate at the University of New Brunswick, where she is studying the Acadians of the Maritime Provinces in the Great War. She is also a high school history teacher at Saint John High School, where she has taught since 2002.

Canada’s Eagles over HUSKY: Canadian Airmen in the Battle of Sicily
by Alexander Fitzgerald-Black

Alex has been published in a number of popular and academic periodicals. Most recently, he wrote an article for Airforce Magazine entitled “Two Canadian Aces of ‘The Greatest Air Battle of the Mediterranean War.’” In late 2013, “Canadian Airmen over Italy” appeared in Legion Magazine. Earlier that year, he co-authored “Husky’s Price: A Window on 21 Lives Lost in Sicily” in Canadian Military History, having previously published in that leading academic journal in 2012. He maintains a blog focusing mainly on his historical research at www.alexfitzblack.wordpress.com and is a contributor to balloonstodrones.wordpress.com. He also posts regularly on twitter as @alexfitzblack.  He has an MA in History from the University of New Brunswick and is presently working to turn his thesis into a manuscript.

Who Were Their Liberators?
by Matthew Douglass

Matthew Douglass is a Fredericton native. He obtained his Masters in History at the University of New Brunswick in 2013, where he examined the combat effectiveness of the New Brunswick Rangers, an Independent Heavy Machine Gun company during the Second World War. He was a participant of the 2012 Canadian Battlefields Foundation Tour to France and Belgium, and the following summer he took part in the Canadian-American Staff Ride Tour of Sicily that coincided with the 70th Anniversary commemoration tour. He is currently expanding his MA thesis into a manuscript for the New Brunswick Military Heritage Project series while also pursuing an MBA. Matt can be found on Twitter using the handle @matty_d_89

Canadian Army Humour: Second World War
By Lieutenant Colonel W.A. (Bill) Leavey, MA, CD (Retired)

Lieutenant-Colonel (Retired) W.A. (Bill) Leavey served in the Canadian Army Infantry from 1967 to 2008. The field units he served in include the Black Watch, Royal Highland Regiment of Canada (RHC), the Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR), the Canadian Airborne Regiment (CAR), and the Princess of Wales Own Regiment (PWOR). From 1994 to 1998 he was seconded with Veterans Affairs Canada as military liaison officer for the Canada Remembers Program, a commemoration group celebrating battle and campaign anniversaries for all of Canada’s major wartime events. LCol Leavey holds a Master’s degree in English from the Royal Military College. He has written two books of anecdotes for the RHC and RCR, entitled War Stories, Anecdotes and Lies. LCol Leavey has also published numerous stories, articles, and essays on military humour and humour in general in local and national magazines and newspapers. He lives in Kingston, Ontario with his wife Maureen, a 35-year veteran herself, and their granddaughter Maggee, 11, and her pet rabbit Humphrey.

 

 Purchase  Canadians and War, Vol. 1 now!

Announcing Book on the Challenges of Digitizing Medical Records and E-Government

Lammi Publishing, Inc. is pleased to announce that it has acquired the worldwide electronic English language rights to the health care book. Digital Information Revolution Changes in Canada: E-Government Design, the Battle against Illicit Drugs, and Health Care Reform by Scarlett Kelly.

The book lays out the benefits of the digitization of health records and the challenges that need to be overcome for widespread adoption, such as concerns from physicians and the general public. The particular intricacies of the Canadian federal system make the challenge all the more difficult. Kelly calls for a strong federal government response.

This publication opens up an important new aspect of our publishing list. It gives the lay reader the ability to understand some of the debates usually held behind closed doors or in conferences. All of us at one time or another will deal with the health care system. As Kelly’s book shows, this system is to be shaped by technology in the future.

Currently in the joint Master of Public Administration and Master of Library and Information Studies program at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS, Scarlett Kelly has a diverse academic and professional background that includes English literature, consecutive interpretation, science, administration, finance, budgeting, marketing, project management, program evaluation, planning, and database management. Fascinated by the positive changes that the digital information revolution can bring to Canada, Scarlett has presently dedicated her academic research and future career to information management in the public sector. She aims to improve the current government functions with digital information management systems in order to achieve cost-reduction, efficiency, coordination, and citizen-centred services

The book is now in the editing phase. Publication will be in late August or early September.  It will be released through all major distribution channels and in appropriate formats. For updates please join our mailing list or follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

 

Announcing the biography of Rfm. George Carvell

Lammi Publishing, Inc. is pleased to announce that it has acquired the worldwide electronic English language rights to the biography I’m a Survivor not a Victim: The Experiences of Normandy Veteran George Carvell and His Reintegration into Society by Amanda Shepherd.

The book documents the experiences of Rfm. George Carvell, of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, during his time in the Canadian Army from 1942-1945 and his reintegration into Canadian society post-1945. His training for the Second World War, his service in the Normandy invasion, and his captivity all offer insight to the experiences of a Canadian soldier during the Second World War. Often soldiers are viewed as victims from their military service because of the prominence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. However, most were not victims, but survivors, and they used their experiences in positive ways. Carvell was reintegrated to civilian life after the war and used his wartime experiences to educate his community through remembrance projects and elementary education. His life is proof positive that soldiers can come back from war as strong, productive individuals. The book not only discusses his personal experience, but also provides a synthesis of current research on the subject of Canadian POWs and lesser-known actions during the attack on Juno Beach.

Amanda Shepherd has just successfully graduated with her Masters of Arts degree from the University of New Brunswick in Canadian Military History. She comes from a proud military family and plans to continue her research into her family’s involvement in the World Wars and the Afghan War. She has presented her research at several conferences across Canada and has made presentations about remembrance in her hometown of Saint John, New Brunswick. Amanda is excited to visit the Canadian battlefields in Europe again to advance her knowledge on the topic. When she is not working on her research, she is working full time as the director of a daycare. She is an avid Nascar fan and scrapbooker. Amanda currently resides in St. Albert, Alberta.

The book is now in the editing phase. Publication date will be announced. It will be released through all major distribution channels and in appropriate formats. For updates please join our mailing list or follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

Dr. Charles H. Read Jr’s Memoirs of HMS Nabob Acquired

Lammi Publishing inc. is pleased to announce that it has acquired the worldwide electronic English language rights to the wartime memoirs of Dr. Charles H. Read, Jr.

Dr. Read served as a flight surgeon aboard HMS Nabob, the first aircraft carrier crewed mainly by Canadians as part of the Royal Navy. We believe that this is the first memoir published that will focus on the experience of the crew. Most of the material written about the vessel has been based around the ship’s specifications, rather than those who served. The book describes Dr. Read’s determination to be a member of the crew as well as his perceptions on the crewmen and wartime England. The memoir concludes with the ship’s participation in the attack on the Tirpitz, where it was torpedoed by U-354.

Those fascinated in the naval history of the Second World War and Canadian naval history will be particularly interested by his account of the ship’s torpedoing and recovery operations. His criticisms of the ship’s Captain Nelson Lay are likely to cause a re-evaluation of the captain’s actions.

Sadly Dr. Read passed away last week at the age of 97. We send our condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.

The book is now in the editing phase. Title and publication date will be announced. It will be released through all major distribution channels and in appropriate formats. For updates please join our mailing list or follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

Remembrance Day

We pause to remember those who sacrificed for our freedoms.

Losing History

Centurions

I was reading a competitors book over the weekend on Roman Centurions where it was pointed out that we don’t know the rules governing promotions and the like.  [1]  Presumably the historians that wrote things down either believed that their audiences didn’t care about such things or for that matter already would’ve known them. Which causes a problem trying to reconstruct things from the limited evidence we have.

I think there’s a perception that especially today information is infinite. Where politicians and even sometimes private citizens will have their innermost thoughts and often feelings dumped out over social media for all the world to point and laugh at. But we forget just how vital it is to have primary sources. Think of all those Canadians who served in the second world war for instance. How many of them wrote memoirs? How many firefights, Atlantic convoys or bombing runs over Germany have only been written about once or twice? Yes perhaps by absolutely no one. A line in the war diary or notation on a casualty sheet is all

This is not to slight secondary sources far from it. But without those sources so much of history would simply be markers moving back-and-forth on a map. Without any context. Showing what bravery duty and sacrifice was required. It would be something that we as historians would be impoverished without.

What you can do

Maybe you served and have taken the time to write something about your experiences. We would love to hear from you. Then again you may have a family member, friend or colleague who you know served please let them know that we are here and we are interested. Take a look at our submission guidelines page. It would be terrible to lose anymore history.


1.Raffaele D’Amato, Roman Centurions 753-31 BC : the kingdom and the Age of Consuls (Oxford, Osprey Publishing, 2011), Kindle edition. chap. Career and Status